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Welcome to Chicken Run Rescue!
CHICKEN RUN RESCUE

GETTING CHICKENS

CHICKEN HEALTH, HOUSING & CARE
PHYSICAL EXAM FOR CHICKENS
RADIO MNARTIST INTERVIEWS CHICKEN RUN RESCUE FOUNDER MARY BRITTON CLOUSE
MINIMUM COSTS FOR KEEPING CHICKENS BASIC CHICKEN CARE
CHICKEN RUN RESCUE PHOTO CONTEST ADVANTAGES OF ADOPTION HEALTHY DIET FOR CHICKENS
CARING FOR SICK AND INJURED CHICKENS
FEATURE VIDEO ABOUT CHICKEN RUN RESCUE

FOSTER CARE FOR FOWL

BY NIKKI TUNDEL, MINNESOTA PUBLIC RADIO


FINDING A NEW HOME FOR A CHICKEN MODEL BACKYARD COOP & PEN

IRA GLASS TALKS WITH DAVID LETTERMAN ABOUT CHICKENS
CHICKEN CARE LINKS

LEARN ABOUT CHICKEN CARE-VOLUNTEER!

NON-LETHAL PREDATOR CONTROL

PREDATORS OF DOMESTIC FOWL IN MINNESOTA

  COMING SOON! ARTICLES BY CHICKEN RUN RESCUE RECOMMENDATIONS FOR SHELTER CARE FOR CHICKENS
  CHICKENS HEARD AT CITY HALL

RECOMMENDATIONS FOR MUNICIPAL REGULATION OF URBAN CHICKENS

 

COLLECTIVE SANCTUARY STATEMENT ON BACKYARD CHICKENS

INTRODUCING

NEW FLOCK MEMBERS

 

Increased Demand for Placement of "Urban Farm" Animals

Veterinary Expenses for Urban Rescues as Indicator of Poor Care

 

 

ABOUT CHICKEN RUN RESCUE:

Every year, domestic fowl, mostly chickens, are impounded by Minneapolis Animal Control (MAC). These birds are victims of neglect, abuse and abandonment, sometimes used as a source of eggs or intended for slaughter, fighting or ritual sacrifice. Some are the discarded outcome of "nature lessons" for children or after a hobby that no longer holds interest. After their release from MAC, Chicken Run provides the birds with temporary shelter and vet care, locates and screens adopters within 90 miles of the Twin Cities and transports the birds to their new homes. Chicken Run Rescue is the only urban chicken rescue of its kind and receives no support from any other organizations, institutions or agencies and depends entirely on donations and sales of art merchandise to continue helping chickens. There is a special need for rooster homes. Don't breed or buy- Adopt! There are never enough homes for displaced animals.

People who want to help individual chickens can do so by adopting them as companions.
We can help them all by adopting a plant based diet.

To make a tax deductible donation, just click:

 Donate Now

or with PayPal

You can also write a check payable to Chicken Run Rescue

And mail to: Chicken Run Rescue
PO Box 11742
Minneapolis, MN 55411

SUBSCRIBE to our Adoption Chronicles Email Newsletter!

Current & archived online issues also available:

June 2011

January 2011

September 2010

June 2010

Listen to Radio MnArtist's Marya Morstad interview Chicken Run Rescue founder Mary Britton Clouse: Marya Morstad talks to Mary Britton Clouse

Watch radio personality Ira Glass talk with TV host David Letterman about Chickens and why he doesn't eat them anymore! Ira Glass Talks About Chickens

 

THINGS TO CONSIDER BEFORE GETTING CHICKENS


REASONS TO ADOPT CHICKENS AS COMPANION ANIMALS:

Chickens are highly intelligent, gentle, vivacious individuals who form strong lifelong emotional bonds with each other as well as other species.

They are warm and silky and lovely to hold.

They are primarily ground dwelling birds who are very home and routine centered and can thrive in a space the size of a normal urban backyard and home. They can coexist happily with compatible dogs and cats and have similar life spans.

Adopting a chicken will increase compassion and reduce violence in the world. They are the most unjustly treated land animals on the planet. Each year in the US, over 10 billion chickens suffer from intense confinement, cruel handling and painful terrifying deaths. Although they represent over 95% of the animals raised for agricultural and other purposes, they are excluded from protection of anticruelty laws, humane slaughter laws and laws that regulate experimentation.

 

REASONS NOT TO PURCHASE CHICKS FROM HATCHERIES:

REASONS NOT TO PURCHASE CHICKS FROM HATCHERIES:

Breeding always displaces existing animals who need homes.

50 % disposed of as waste
Since they are of no value in the production of eggs, a quarter billion male chicks a year are disposed of at the hatchery. Males, 50% of the chicks hatched by hatcheries and commercial egg breeding facilities, are killed as soon as their sex is determined at a day or two day old. The unwanted males and deformed females are suffocated in the garbage or macerated (ground up alive) for fertilizer or feed or they are sold for meat production. Only hens are wanted for their eggs. There are no laws to protect the chicks from any cost-efficient (read: cruel) method of disposal the producer chooses. Poultry is exempt from humane slaughter laws.  At a facility like McMurray’s Hatchery, this amounts to 80,000 chicks per week, 40,000 of them doomed from the start.
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Mistaken for hens, a few males slip through the sexing and wind up in hobbiest’s shipments- sometimes intentionally included as live “packing material” to be discarded as the recipient sees fit. It is difficult to determine the sex of most breeds until about 6 months so it is no coincidence that most roosters are that age when they are abandoned or headed for a stew pot.

30 to 80% die in transit
Baby chicks are transported in the mail and subject to heat, cold and  food and water deprivation. They  suffer and die in airline transport all the time. Unlike human passengers and companion animals who fly in weather-controlled, ventilated compartments, day-old chickens, ducks, geese, partridges, pheasants, guinea fowl, quails and turkeys are shipped like luggage. These birds do not travel as “cargo,” like your cat or dog, but as mail, this being the cheapest way for hatcheries to fly them for use as Easter gifts, science and 4-H projects, breeding, cockfighting, backyard poultry keeping, target practice, or whatever the buyer wants to do with them.

In nature, when chicks hatch under a mother hen, the earliest hatched chicks must wait for all the chicks to hatch. They survive by absorbing their yolk nutrients during this time. A clutch of chicks normally hatches between 24 and 48 hours ˆ not 72 hours. Held in commercial incubators, the earliest hatching chicks shipped to customers as airmail may already be 36 hours old even before they are loaded onto the plane.

For this and other reasons, including excessive heat, excessive cold, poor packaging, and being banged around in their boxes, chicks in airline transport die all the time. An average of 30 percent to as high as 80 percent of birds arrive dead, according to the airlines. Unlike human passengers and companion animals who fly in weather-controlled, ventilated compartments, the chicks are shipped like luggage ˆ because it's cheap ˆ according to Post Office rules established in 1924 to accommodate the hatchery lobby.

When to these problems the fact is added that many flights include extended layovers, it is clear why so many chicks, even if they survive the flight, die soon after reaching their final destination. The stress, including lack of food and water, has left them too weak to eat and drink. Birds with dehydrated internal organs do not recover.

The best thing that people who truly love chickens in a responsible manner can do is to adopt one or more birds from a humane society, shelter or rescue group such as Chicken Run Rescue.

Thanks to United Poultry Concens for contributing to this information.

Hy-Line Hatchery, Spencer, Iowa
INSIDE A HATCHERY
Mercy For Animals (MFA) undercover investigation inside a typical modern industrial hatchery with footage of chick sexing, rooster disposal and debeaking.



VET CLINICS FOR CHICKEN CARE MINNESOTA / WESTERN WISCONSIN AREA

CHICKEN VET SURVEY - CRR is always looking to improve access to vet care for chickens. If you know of a clinic that provides care for chickens in the Minnesota/Western Wisconsin are, please email us with their contact information so we can post it here.

This list does not constitute an endorsement.

Animal Emergency Clinic
Dr. Kathy Rausch
1542 W 7th St
St. Paul, MN 55102
651-293-1800
Animal Emergency Clinic
Dr. Kathy Rausch
7166 10th St N
Oakdale, MN 55128
651-501-3766
Camden Pet Hospital
Dr. Cynthia Fetzer
1401 44th Ave. N
Minneapolis, MN 55412
612-522-4374
Valley View Pet Hospital
Drs. Larry and Michelle Tholl
13600 Cty. Rd 11
Burnsville, MN 55337
952-432-9661
Cedar Pet Clinic
Drs. John Baillie, Anna Ulfeng, Noemi Plantz
11051 Stillwater Boulevard
Lake Elmo, MN 55042
651-770-3250
VCA Cedar Animal Hospital
3604 Cedar Avenue South
Minneapolis, MN 55407
612-721-7431
Animal & Exotic Wellnes Center
Dr. Jina Andrews
19276 Evans St NW
Elk River, MN 55330
763-633-7387
Como Park Animal Hospital
1014 North Dale Street
Saint Paul, MN 55117
651-487-3255
Companions Animal Hospital of St. Cloud
2703 Clearwater Road
St. Cloud, MN 56301
320-252-6700
Avian & Exotic Veterinary
Housecall Service, PLLC

Dr. Jaime Pajak
vet@aevhs.com
612-520-1386
Countryside Veterinary Clinic
Dr. Brian Keller
1231 N Knowles Ave.
New Richmond, WI 54017
715-246-5606
Elm Creek Animal Hospital
Dr. Michelle Kaner
327 Dean Ave. East
Champlin, MN 55316
763-427-5150
Jordan Veterinary Clinic
Dr. Rich Lancello
560 2nd St W
Jordan, MN 55352
952-492-5000

St. Joseph Veterinary Clinic
Dr. Dennis Bechtold
1722 Minnesota Street E.
St Joseph, MN 56374
320-363-7756
Crow River Animal Hospital
Dr. Melissa Shelton
1969 Co. Rd. 5, PO Box 336
Howard Lake, MN 55349
320-286-3277
Ark Pet Hospital
Dr. Mary Philippson
151 Silver Lake Road NW Suite 109
New Brighton, MN 55112
651-633-0567
  Watertown Vet Clinic
Dr. Katrina Gustafson
300 Angel Ave SW
Watertown, MN 55388
952-955-1525


 

CHICKEN CARE LINKS

http://www.farmanimalshelters.org/care_chicken.htm
http://www.upc-online.org/chickens/
http://www.msstate.edu/dept/poultry/disaid.htm
http://parrothouse.com/hlthcare.html#Emergency%20Sick%20Bird%20Care

 

HOW TO ADOPT

If you are more interested in eggs than in the companionship of a chicken, please stop here.

1. Meet our birds available for adoption on our Facebook Page and our Petfinders Site.

2. Send us an e-mail about the bird(s) who you are interested in with "Adopt" in subject line.

3. We will contact you by phone.

4. We bring the birds to their new home. An adoption agreement is signed and fee paid at that time. The adoption fee is $10 per bird but additional donations of any size are greatly needed and appreciated.

 

COMING SOON!

Minnesota Chicken Care: Housing, Health and Happiness, Caring for a Sick or Injured Chicken, Healthy Diet for Chickens, Socializing Roosters, Living with House Chickens, Gardening for and with Chickens, Introducing Roosters to New Flock Members.

 

CHICKEN RUN RESCUE PHOTO CONTEST

INTERNATIONAL RESPECT FOR CHICKENS DAY- MAY 4TH

What better month than May to honor our chicken friends as they revel in the dirt and things that are green. And what better teachers than they about how to celebrate spring. It's the perfect time to speak up for the most unjustly treated beings in the world.

Please join Chicken Run Rescue and United Poultry Concerns in recognizing May as International Respect for Chickens Month. We invite you to capture the beauty, joy, intelligence, dignity, agility and zany exuberance of your birds in a photograph.

Twelve winning photos will be published in a calendar and winners will receive a free calendar.

All of the proceeds of the calendar sales will enable us to continue to help chickens for another year. Chicken Run Rescue receives no support from any other organizations, institutions or agencies. Chicken Run Rescue is the only urban based chicken rescue and adoption organization of its kind.

To view entries for the 2012 Chicken Run Rescue Photo Contest visit:

http://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10151428355155201.830500.475016785200&type=3

To view entries and winners of previous years Chicken Run Rescue Photo Contest visit:

http://www.brittonclouse.com/chickenrunrescue/photos11/

http://www.brittonclouse.com/chickenrunrescue/photos10/

http://www.brittonclouse.com/chickenrunrescue/photos09/

http://www.brittonclouse.com/chickenrunrescue/photos08/

http://www.brittonclouse.com/chickenrunrescue/photos07/

http://www.brittonclouse.com/chickenrunrescue/photos/

For more information about United Poultry Concerns please visit:http://www.upc-online.org/

CONTEST RULES
Photograph everyday activities that are natural for your bird- no costumes, staged stunts or props. CRR reserves the right to decline any images that conflict with our mission to promote the adoption of homeless chickens as companion animals and discourage breeding or buying. There are never enough homes for displaced animals.

Submission Deadline: May 15
Voting: ongoing thru May 15
Winners Announced: June 4

Send high resolution digital photos to  chickenrunrescue@comcast.net Include your name, title or bird's name, address, phone and email address.

RELEASE AGREEMENT
Submission of photographs implies acceptance of the following  terms:
Entrants in the Chicken Run Rescue Photo Contest retain all copyrights and other equivalent rights to their entered photographs. However, Entrants give Chicken Run Rescue the right to reproduce and publish their photographs and name in a calendar and in advertising to promote sales of the calendar.  In all cases where such photographs and names are used, Entrants give Chicken Run Rescue the right to do so without obtaining the photographer's further prior permission and without offering any compensation in any form except for the token prize of one free calendar.

 

CHICKEN RUN RESCUE CALENDAR AND GREETING CARDS
   
Order your 2014 Chicken Run Rescue Photo Contest Calendar Now!
 
Great gifts, Great cause!

A new inspiring picture and quote each month!

2014 Calendar $25


note cards
10 per pack with envelopes

Original Art Note Cards $15


 

 
To order by mail, send check or money order to:


Chicken Run Rescue
PO Box 11742
Minneapolis, MN 55411 USA

 
Prices in US dollars include shipping, handling & MN sales tax.
 
100% proceeds enable Chicken Run Rescue
to continue helping chickens.